Rad Blog.

 

Give this a read first. I’m changing my mind a little.

 

So, yeah. This title is pretty exaggerated, but I’ve had some troubled thoughts.

 

The post I liked is one of my older posts on Free To Play games. In a way, I am still standing by it. Free to Play means more games for me. I’m taking what Art said into account, but I’m developing my own broad idea for video games in general.

 

I hate them and I hate the culture.

 

Let’s look into it. Video games are fun. They provide us with a different world where we play as a space commander or some sort of science fiction hero. Some even are simulators for a life we want to live or a job we’re interest to see. They are fun. They really are.

 

There’s been a decline in what games used to be. When games first really hit the public, it was just black screens with blips and bloops. Today, we have pretty darn real graphics and intense story telling. It is a fantastic way for entertainment.

 

So, why do I hate them? What’s wrong with it?

 

I look at video games as a fun medium, but with two very wrathful sides. On one end we have the developers. They make the game and blah blah blah. I don’t really understand it and I don’t want to. What I can understand is business practices. Games cost a lot of money, especially big named ones. This brings me to the other side: the gamers that play video games. Me and you, right? Wrong.

 

Companies make money from customers. That’s how business is. That’s darn basic, but that’s what it is. Video game companies make games that include certain models. A trend today is that games are being released with bugs or unfinished content, just to make release dates. I’m not blaming them for doing it on purpose, but it has been happening a lot. This makes the community mad and they complain. The companies fix it. Then price is even further made in games that add other things, such as boosts or weapons, in paid add ons either through downloadable content or one time small transactions. This is a trend too. People will complain about that. Some will like it. Some will not. There’s war. Always.

 

I’m in the middle here. I make my decisions on playing or buying games or content based on how much I like it. If I like a game, I’ll buy it. If I’m into it, I’ll buy whatever they put out if I feel like I’d like it. If I won’t like it, I don’t buy it.

 

By this definition, I hate games from both sides. On the company side, if I’m not liking a product and therefore not spending anything on it, then obviously I’m not into games. By the community’s standard, if I purchase things by so-called “greedy” developers, I’m a blind follower and therefore hate games and enjoy being a subject to greed.

 

I’ll do both of these groups a favour. I’ll just say I hate video games and only play them because I’m masochistic or something.

 

I’ll reference my Free to Play post. Free to Play’s concept sounds good. You get a free game to play, but in order to progress at all, you’ll probably have to fork over some money for some sort of boost. Spiral Knights really turned this way with their new crafting system. Before, you just paid for energy and made your darn weapon. Now, you have to buy these ridiculous crystals that MAY or MAY not work for each level your weapon hits. Before, you would just level up (slowly) to level 10 and then upgrade. Each level now requires this stupid crafting process with crystals. I mean, you can get the crystals for free, but the high level crystals are really rare. You can always pay for them, but they cost a lot, especially if you fail. Spiral Knights is free, but you’ll find you might spend more money in the end just trying to progress.

 

Again, sometimes I don’t mind this sort of model. When it was all based on energy, I gladly paid for it with real money. IT was worth it. Now, the success rate is too low for me to see any worth of it. I stopped playing.

 

Now, paid games are starting to add certain things in it to keep the game rolling. Mass Effect 3’s multiplayer had this crate system that you could spend real money on or use the in-game credits you earn from doing missions. These crates gave you new weapons or training which were essential to progress on harder difficulties. Using the in-game credits works fine, but if you’re bad at the game (like me) or just starting, you’ll have to play through the easiest difficulty a lot just to make enough credits to be competent enough to play the harder difficulties. again, I’m bad to both sides. for one, I’m not paying real money to for the crates and two, I’m not playing the harder difficulties because I just don’t care. To EA, they think I’m not into their game. To the people that played the Mass Effect 3 multiplayer, I’m a loser casual that only plays on easy mode.

 

It is just easier to say I hate games at this point.

 

What I’m doing is ignoring both sides. I don’t care if the company things I don’t want their crap. I don’t care about being call a sheep or a casual by the community. I’m not part of your development team. I’m not part of your community. I hate your gaming. I’ll just play how I want. It makes me a lot happier when I don’t have an opinion or when I just don’t think about this sort of thing. Video games are stupid.

 

What’s happening to me is I’m being brought down by two sides. On the one side, it is financial. On the other, it is a bunch of people with opinions. I belong to neither side so I’m saying by definition I must hate video games. Whatever.

 

Why am I writing this? I’m just weighed down by everything. I need to get stuff off my mind. Do I wanna know what you think about this? No. I don’t. I’ll approve your comment if you decide to leave one, but I’m not furthering the discussion. This is one of my think and feel better pieces.

 

I think I’ll be happier if I don’t have opinions on things. It is why I don’t involve myself with video games that often. It is why I’d be a terrible game blogger. It is why I’d be terrible at reviews. Who cares about what I think? I don’t represent the community. I don’t represent companies. I’m Chas Rad and I represent me.

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